Warren Co. Underground Railroad station honored with historical marker

Henry Thomas and Nancy Butterworth have been honored with a new Ohio historical marker at the site of their mid-1800s home in southern Warren County.

Their family contributed their land in Hamilton Township as a station on the Underground Railroad and helped hundreds of fugitive slaves fleeing north in the decades before the Civil War. Slaves would find shelter in a saferoom in their home on the banks of the Little Miami River before moving onward to Lebanon or Clinton County.

The Butterworths’ two-story house at 9299 Sibcy Road still stands today, and on Saturday, June 6 a historical marker was unveiled at the site with Butterworth family descendants and Friends of the 20 Mile House present at the ceremony. The marker is near mile marker 39 on the Little Miami Scenic Trail.

"Southern Ohio played a vital role in the success of the Underground Railroad in helping enslaved people reach freedom, and Ohioans did so at great risk to themselves," said the Local History Office at the Ohio History Connection. "Markers are a reminder that history always happens in a place and that, at least in Ohio, there are a lot of those places!  We hope that this marker for Butterworth Station will make the contributions of Ohioans more visible to the public, so that we can be inspired by the actions and sacrifices of those that travelled on and supported the Underground Railroad."

The Butterworths were Quaker abolitionists who moved north to states that outlawed slavery, and the family’s contributions to the Underground Railroad didn’t stop with them. Henry Thomas’s brother William also sheltered slaves in his nearby barn, and Nancy’s cousin Levi Coffin was known as the “President of the Underground Railroad” for his work in Indiana and Cincinnati.

For more information on Underground Railroad sites in Ohio and the Cincinnati area, check out this list.

Elizabeth Cychosz
Marketing & Communications Intern