Voices - Connections

Connections

Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 4:09pm

The Youth Pages Toledo App

Human trafficking is a big issue in our country and that is the reason why The Youth Pages Toledo app was created. The app is geared towards children and teenagers because they are most vulnerable to human trafficking. It provides information about the warning signs of human trafficking, including drug abuse, homelessness or runaway status and control by a boyfriend or other individual. The app also provides information like phone numbers and websites on where the youth can go to get help for drugs, health, school, money and work.

The app was developed jointly by the University of Toledo Human Trafficking and Social Justice Institute, the United Way of Greater Toledo, and the Lucas County Human Trafficking Coalition. It cost about $19,000 to develop and was heavily funded by grants from the Ohio Children’s Trust Fund and the Zonta Club of Toledo. The Toledo Area Regional Transit Authority plans to create signs to promote the app on all of their buses by Fall. They have also trained their drivers to recognize situations among their passengers and along routes that may suggest trafficking or related issues.

The app can be downloaded for free on both Android and iPhone devices with English and Spanish versions.

-Katie Johnstone
Marketing and Communications Intern

Related Content: End Slavery Now

More authored by Katie: #FlameFriday: Toni Stone, Planning your visit Friday, July 10Misty Copland- First African-American woman promoted at the American Ballet Theatre#FlameFriday: Remembering Officer Kim, and Freedmen's Bureau Indexing Campaign

Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 3:26pm

Freedom Center’s Hathaway debunks myths about human trafficking

Brooke Hathaway, manager of anti-trafficking programs for the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, recently wrote a post published on the International Human Trafficking Institute’s website addressing myths about modern-day human trafficking.

Hathaway is also the executive director of End Slavery Now, which advocates for awareness of human trafficking and seeks to inspire everyone to take the courageous steps against slavery today.

In the post, she calls out sensationalist social media posts for perpetuating the myths that trafficking is a crime of kidnapping, that trafficking is an impulsive crime, and that middle-class women and girls are the most vulnerable.

On the contrary, Hathaway explains, human trafficking is much more commonly based on trusting relationships between the trafficker and victim, which develop purposefully over time, and it disproportionately affects minorities and disadvantaged groups.

“While interest in human trafficking demonstrates growing awareness about the issue, it does not translate to any increased understanding of the human pain and tragedy,” she cautions, encouraging readers to gain deeper knowledge about the realities of trafficking. “Consequently, it does not result in any change in individuals’ behaviors or attitudes.”

Click here to read Hathaway’s piece and to watch an interview with her about these myths.

Elizabeth Cychosz 
Marketing and Communications Intern

Photo: Freedom Center Manager of Anti-Trafficking Programs Brooke Hathaway. Provided.

Related Content:  Invisible: Slavery Today

More authored by Elizabeth: Mason man recalls Tiananmen SquareDr. Newsome speaks at international conference in ParisWarren County Underground Railroad station honored with historical markerNHL selects first Chinese player14th Amendment Ratified on this Day, 1868,Former Auschwitz guard sentencedHonor Nelson Mandela this Sat with 67 min of service

Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 2:50pm

Local woman to compete in Special Olympics World Games

The Cincinnati area can cheer on for a local in the 2015 Special Olympics World Games, which begins this Saturday in Los Angeles.

Danielle Blakeney, 24, of Erlanger in Northern Kentucky will compete with 7,000 athletes from 177 countries in this global celebration of skill, courage, teamwork and joy.

Blakeney, who has been a Special Olympics athlete for 17 years, is the only participant from Northern Kentucky and one of three from the state. She will compete in rhythmic gymnastics this year, and the preliminary competition will begin at 5:30 p.m. EST on Sunday, July 26. In the past, she has also competed in artistic gymnastics, track and field and cheerleading.

“Special Olympics is important to me ... because it lets me learn to be the best I can be, has given me great friends and coaches and the chance to travel that I would otherwise not have ever had,” Blakeney said in a statement. “I have become a more confident person and stronger against people being mean.”

This will be Blakeney’s second Special Olympics World Games. In 2011, she won three Gold, one Silver and one Bronze medal in Athens, Greece, and she also competed in the USA Games in 2010 and 2014. She is an advocate for the Special Olympics in her home state, having traveled to the Kentucky capitol earlier this year to support a tax return donation bill.

According to the Special Olympics website, “Through the power of sport, Special Olympics strives to create a better world by fostering the acceptance and inclusion of all people.” It has been an annual event since its beginning in 1968.

The games will run through August 2 and are expected to attract 80,000 spectators in-house and millions more watching the ESPN broadcast. The opening ceremonies will be broadcast live on ESPN Saturday at 8 p.m. EST.

Elizabeth Cychosz 
Marketing and Communications Intern

Related Content: Diversity in Baseball

Photo: Blakeney competed in the Special Olympics Kentucky State Summer Games last month. (Credit: provided to The Cincinnati Enquirer)

More authored by Elizabeth: Mason man recalls Tiananmen SquareDr. Newsome speaks at international conference in ParisWarren County Underground Railroad station honored with historical markerNHL selects first Chinese player14th Amendment Ratified on this Day, 1868Former Auschwitz guard sentencedHonor Nelson Mandela this Sat with 67 min of service

Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 10:13am

Cincinnati Sit-in a "protest of normalcy"

When Robin Martin moved to Cincinnati in 2007, she noticed that most of the people in the placed she frequented didn’t look like her, she said in an opinion piece to The Cincinnati Enquirer on Monday, July 20.

“Cincinnati is the most segregated city I’ve lived in.” she wrote, citing her time in New Orleans, California and Houston. “It doesn’t have to be, though.”

After several years, Martin decided to do something about the lack of integration she saw in restaurants and other social outing locations. In summer 2013, she launched the Cincinnati Sit-in (CSI), modeled after the Woolworth sit-ins during the Civil Rights Movement, in which she and 24 friends simply spent time in places where they might be the only black faces.

Martin explained that CSI is a “protest of normalcy” and is designed to spark conversations about why Cincinnati seems to be racially segregated in certain places. What started out as a small group in 2013 has since grown into a community of 65 black professionals who are, as Martin wrote, “determined to change the face of local businesses and communities.”

“Next time you take your family out to dinner, quietly take inventory around the room and see who’s missing,” she said. “Consider how we as a community include or exclude differences… If you notice an absence, I challenge everyone to seek answers purposefully, until we see change.”

To learn more about CSI and Martin’s observations about racial and ethnic integration in Cincinnati, read her opinion piece here.

Elizabeth Cychosz 
Marketing and Communications Intern

Photo: Robin Martin is associate provote for special initiatives at the University of Cincinnati. (Photo provided to The Cincinnati Enquirer)

More authored by Elizabeth: Mason man recalls Tiananmen SquareDr. Newsome speaks at international conference in ParisWarren County Underground Railroad station honored with historical markerNHL selects first Chinese player14th Amendment Ratified on this Day, 1868Former Auschwitz guard sentencedHonor Nelson Mandela this Sat with 67 min of service

Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 12:26pm

OH Human Trafficking Task Force makes recommendations

Ohio plans to further improve services for victims of trafficking, the Ohio Human Trafficking Task Force announced in a report on Monday, July 20.

At the top of the priority list: faster access for victims to recovery services like shelters or drug treatments.

The report also outlines plans to increase public awareness and police access to information about tracking human trafficking, as well as a legal path for victims to have their records expunged of charges that came about as a result of being forced into the sex trade.

“Ohio’s progress in combating trafficking is both exciting and sobering,” wrote Ohio’s Anti-Trafficking Coordinator Elizabeth Ranade Janis in the introduction to the report. “More victims have access to justice and more offenders are being punished... However these efforts confirm what advocates already know—more victims will come out of the shadows of exploitation, more intensive law enforcement investigations will be necessary to lock up traffickers, and more trauma-informed care will need to be made available for survivors.”

The recommendations will be implemented by state-level and county-level departments and officials, like the Department of Medicaid, the Attorney General’s Office, and the Department of Job and Family Services.

Three years ago, the task force made 26 other recommendations, almost all of which have been put into place by now. For example, in 2012 the state penalty for human trafficking was upgraded to a first-degree felony, which can come with up to 15 years in prison.

The report estimates roughly one thousand children – mostly young girls between 13 and 18 years of age – are forced into sex trafficking in Ohio each year. Other victims might be forced into sweatshop-like jobs.

Join the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center this Thursday at 3 p.m. for a gallery talk on modern-day human trafficking with representatives from End Slavery Now.

Elizabeth Cychosz 
Marketing and Communications Intern

Related Content:  Invisible: Slavery Today

More authored by Elizabeth: Mason man recalls Tiananmen SquareDr. Newsome speaks at international conference in ParisWarren County Underground Railroad station honored with historical markerNHL selects first Chinese player14th Amendment Ratified on this Day, 1868, Former Auschwitz guard sentenced, Honor Nelson Mandela this Sat with 67 min of service

Wednesday, July 15, 2015 - 11:28am

Honor Nelson Mandela this Sat with 67 min of service

This Saturday, July 18, the United Nations and the Nelson Mandela Foundation honor the equal rights activist Nelson Mandela (1918-2013) during Nelson Mandela International Day.

In 1991, Mandela became the first democratically elected president of a free South Africa after working for decades toward an end to the injustices and inequalities perpetuated by apartheid (1948-1991), a set of laws that segregated the majority nonwhite South Africans from their white counterparts.

He is also known for being a human rights lawyer, a prisoner of conscience and an international peacemaker. He helped found the Youth League of the African National Congress in 1944 and in 1994 jointly won the Nobel Peace Prize with former South African President Frederik Willem de Klerk “for their work for the peaceful termination of the apartheid regime, and for laying the foundations for a new democratic South Africa.”

Mandela’s tireless work and many sacrifices in the pursuit of freedom and equality for all in South Africa have been inspirational to generations of activists. Take the time this Saturday to honor the call of Nelson Mandela International Day to dedicate 67 minutes of time to helping others in the same way Mandela served humanity for 67 years.

Elizabeth Cychosz 
Marketing and Communications Intern

Photo: Nelson Mandela smiles in front of the South African flag. (Source: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/viewers-guide-to-mandelas-funeral-an...)

Related Content:  Unlocking the Gates of Auschwitz 70 Years Later

More authored by Elizabeth: Mason man recalls Tiananmen SquareDr. Newsome speaks at international conference in ParisWarren County Underground Railroad station honored with historical markerNHL selects first Chinese player14th Amendment Ratified on this Day, 1868

Wednesday, July 15, 2015 - 10:50am

Former Auschwitz guard sentenced

This Wednesday, July 15, former Auschwitz guard Oskar Gröning was sentenced to four years in prison for being an accessory to the deaths of 300,000 people in “what could be one of the last big Holocaust trials.” The 94-year-old German has been on trial in the northern German city of Lüneburg since April.

The death camp at Auschwitz-Birkenau in Nazi-occupied Poland claimed the lives of 1.1 million people, mostly Jews, during its operation from 1942 to 1945. Gröning’s trial focused mostly on the period from May to July 1944, during which 137 trains brought 425,000 people to Auschwitz and at least 300,000 were killed in the gas chambers.

During the trial proceedings, Gröning testified that he sorted through the belongings of arriving Jews after they went through the selection process that ended with many being sent to their deaths in the gas chambers. His task was to find valuables, particularly banknotes, to help fund the Nazi regime.

The trial speaks to a question that courts have grappled with since the end of the Second World War: how much guilt the legal system can place on people who acted as small cogs within massive human rights violations like the Holocaust. In 2011, German courts set a precedent that death camp guards can be charged as an accessory to murders committed there, even if that guard is not linked to any specific death. Gröning said he accepts moral guilt but said early on in the trial that he would leave it up to the court to decide his legal guilt.

Earlier this year, the Freedom Center hosted Unlocking the Gates of Auschwitz 70 Years Later, which featured the stories of two survivors of the death camp: Werner Coppel and Bella Ouziel. Auschwitz’s history of systemic and organized genocide provides a start warning and call to action for those today to stand up against injustice, inhumanity and genocide.

Elizabeth Cychosz 
Marketing and Communications Intern

Related Content:  Unlocking the Gates of Auschwitz 70 Years Later

More authored by Elizabeth: Mason man recalls Tiananmen SquareDr. Newsome speaks at international conference in ParisWarren County Underground Railroad station honored with historical markerNHL selects first Chinese player, 14th Amendment Ratified on this Day, 1868

 

Thursday, July 9, 2015 - 9:47am

14th Amendment Ratified on this Day, 1868

On July 9, 1868, the 14th Amendment to the Constitution was ratified, granting citizenship and its benefits to “all persons born or naturalized in the United States” – a right that was previously denied to formerly enslaved persons.

Although the Emancipation Proclamation and the 13th Amendment ended slavery, at the end of the Civil War people still had a lot of questions about what would happen to those who only recently gained their freedom. Along with the 13th and 15th Amendments – collectively known as the “Reconstruction Amendments” – the 14th Amendment widely expanded the rights of former slaves in the United States.

The authors of the amendment took care to ensure that those civil rights would remain protected, forbidding states from denying anyone “life, liberty or property, without due process of law” or the “equal protection of the laws.”

Commonly referenced by that second phrase, the 14th Amendment has played a key role in many important Supreme Court cases that have shaped the past two centuries.

Brown v. Board of Education (1954), for example, struck down the “separate but equal” doctrine – which structured the Jim Crow south – because it violated the “equal protection” clause of the 14th Amendment. Based on cases against segregated schools in Kansas, South Carolina, Virginia and Delaware, Brown challenged the widely enforced Jim Crow laws that, here, limited black children’s access to the same quality education that their white peers experienced. The court ruled that, even if the schools had access to the same tangible factors (like pencils, science lab equipment, or teachers), the act of separation itself was an act of discrimination that violated the 14th Amendment.

The amendment was a milestone in the history of abolition and civil rights in the United States and has continued to protect people from discrimination throughout the decades. Because of the 14th Amendment, our Constitution upholds the idea that “all” – not just white males – “are created equal”. Learn more about the 14th amendment in From Slavery to Freedom, located on the third floor. 

Elizabeth Cychosz
Marketing and Communications Intern

Photo: Freedom Center exhibit From Slavery to Freedom explores the 14th Amendment in its historical context.

Related Content: The Emancipation Proclamation 

More authored by Elizabeth: Mason man recalls Tiananmen SquareDr. Newsome speaks at international conference in ParisWarren County Underground Railroad station honored with historical marker, NHL selects first Chinese player

Thursday, July 2, 2015 - 12:00am

NHL selects first Chinese player

Andong “Misha” Song, 18, made history last week as the first Chinese player in the National Hockey League after being selected by the New York Islanders with the No. 172 pick on Saturday, June 27. One sports official suggested Song might become “the Yao Ming of Chinese ice hockey.”

The Beijing native has been playing since he was 6 years old, when his mother suggested he try it. He fell in love with it, and his talent was spotted at a young age. His family moved to Canada to help him pursue his dream, as there were few resources for hockey players in China at the time, where some coaches were skeptical at first about a Chinese player.

Since then, Song has starred in games locally and internationally. He currently plays as a defenseman for the Lawrenceville School in New Jersey, and next season he will play for the Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts. For the past two years, he has played for China at the IIHF Division II-B World Under-18 Championship, this year as the team captain.

Ice hockey is a young but already popular sport in China, where 1,500 players play on nearly 100 youth teams in Beijing alone. Parents of these young players have expressed hope that Song’s achievements will boost the popularity of hockey further and that he will be an inspiration for future players. Sports officials hope that the NHL draft will help with China’s bid for the 2022 Winter Olympics.

"Hopefully what I want to do is rally people behind me,” Song said in an interview with the NHL. “Not focus on myself but do something good for Chinese hockey."

Elizabeth Cychosz
Marketing and Communications Intern

Photo: Song poses after being drafted by the New York Islanders. Credit: Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images

Related Content: Diversity in Baseball

More authored by Elizabeth: Mason man recalls Tiananmen SquareDr. Newsome speaks at international conference in ParisWarren County Underground Railroad station honored with historical marker

Wednesday, July 1, 2015 - 1:20pm

Misty Copland- First African-American woman promoted at the American Ballet Theatre

Misty Copland, 32, has become the first African-American female to be promoted to the highest rank at the American Ballet Theatre. She is a 19-year veteran of the company, being promoted from a soloist to a principal dancer. The company has been around for 75 years, making this a huge accomplishment for Copeland. 

Copeland was born in Kansas City, Missouri and raised in San Pedro, California. She began ballet at the age of 13 and studied at the Lauridsen Ballet Centre, San Francisco Ballet School and American Balley Theatre’s Summer Intensive. Copeland joined the American Ballet Theatre as a member of the corps de ballet in April 2001 and was appointed a soloist in August 2007.

In the past year, Copeland has danced a variety of leading roles. Her performances have become events, drawing in large and diverse crowds. She has performed at many prestigious venues including, the Metropolitan Opera House, the Brooklyn Academy of Music and the David H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center. Recently she starred in “Swan Lake,” becoming the first African-American to do so with the Ballet Theater at the Metropolitan Opera House.  

Copeland has also drawn attention outside the world of ballet, appearing in and being the face of national campaigns, including a commercial for Diet Dr. Pepper and Prince’s 2010 tour. In 2014 she became the first ballet dancer to appear in an Under Armour ad, which had more than four million views on YouTube in a week. Last year, Copland was named of one of Time magazine’s 100 most influential people and was featured on one of the covers for the issue.

Though her promotion and recent fame has been celebrated by many, it has also raised questions about why African-American dancers, mainly women, remain so underrepresented at top ballet companies in today’s society. Several dance companies and schools, including the Ballet Theater, have begun new efforts to increase diversity in classic ballet, however doing so will take years.

Copeland strength, talent and determination has opened doors for many women of color to follow in her footsteps. In additional to her many accomplishments, she has become involved in the American Ballet Theatre’s Project Plié, an initiative to draw more diverse dancers into elite ballet.

Katie Johnstone
Marketing and Communications Intern

More authored by Katie: Planning your visit Friday, July 10#FlameFriday: Remembering Officer Kim, andFreedmen's Bureau Indexing Campaign.

Image: Misty Copeland performing in "Swan Lake" at the Metropolitan Opera House. Photo credit: eurweb.com.

Pages